Tag Archives: Columbus

Congress ok’s the killing of wolves and bears in Alaska wildlife refuges

How did YOUR U.S. rep and YOUR TWO, U.S. senators vote?

The U.S. House and the U.S. Senate voted to OVERTURN a rule banning “some of the most appalling practices … denning of wolf pups, killing hibernating bears, spotting grizzly bears from aircraft and then shooting them after landing, and trapping grizzly bears and black bears with steel-jawed leghold traps and snares” … This will be on “16 national wildlife refuges covering 76 million acres, all in the state of Alaska.”

“Republican lawmakers did this for the NRA, the Safari Club, and some hunting guides and outfitters.” (Read the details in Humane Society, linked)

http://blog.humanesociety.org/wayne/2017/02/u-s-house-sanctions-killing-hibernating-bears-wolf-pups-dens-federal-refuges-alaska.html?credit=blog_em_021617_id8790&utm_source=feedblitz&utm_medium=FeedBlitzRss&utm_campaign=humanenation

I strongly encourage you to call your three, federal legislators to voice your support or opposition to their votes.

“Good morning, Senator Brown.  This is (your name), an Ohio voter, calling from (your city and zip code).  Thank you for your NO VOTE on SJ Res 18, which overturns important, wildlife protections for wolf pups and hibernating bears.  It allows for aerial spotting of bears and steel-jawed, leg traps.  I do not support these cruel methods of killing wildlife. I appreciate that you do not either.”

TWEET 

Just click on @SenSherrodBrown below.  You will be taken to his Twitter account. Non-Ohio voters can use their own U.S. senators here.

@SenSherrodBrown   Thanks 4 your NO VOTE on SJ Res 18 – No more killing vulnerable, wolf pups & hibernating bears in Alaska #STOPreversingprotections

@senrobportman  I’m disheartened that you VOTED YES on SJ Res 18 – I oppose killing wolves & bears on Alaskan wildlife refuges 

You can find YOUR two U.S. senators and their contact information at the link below.  Contact information for Ohio Senators Brown and Portman follow. 

https://www.senate.gov/senators/contact/  (Find all 100 U.S. senators here)

http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/   (Find all 435 U.S. representatives here)  

Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown (D)

Cleveland  (216) 522-7272     Toll Free 1-888-896-OHIO (6446)

Cincinnati  (513) 684-1021     Columbus  (614) 469-2083

Lorain  (440) 242-4100     Washington, DC  (202) 224-2315

Ohio Senator Rob Portman (R)

Washington, D.C.   (202) 224-3353     Columbus (614) 469-6774

Toll-Free 1-800-205-6446 (OHIO)     Cincinnati  (513) 684-3265

Cleveland  (216)  522-7095     Toledo  (419)  259-3895

https://www.senate.gov/senators/contact/  (Find all 100 U.S. senators here.)

U.S. senators voted largely on party lines 52-48, 2 not voting

YEAS – 52  (to OVERTURN the current rule)
Alexander (R-TN)   Barrasso (R-WY)   Blunt (R-MO)
Boozman (R-AR)   Burr (R-NC)   Capito (R-WV)
Cassidy (R-LA)   Cochran (R-MS)   Collins (R-ME)
Corker (R-TN)   Cornyn (R-TX)   Cotton (R-AR)
Crapo (R-ID)   Cruz (R-TX)   Daines (R-MT)
Enzi (R-WY)   Ernst (R-IA)   Fischer (R-NE)
Flake (R-AZ)   Gardner (R-CO)   Graham (R-SC)
Grassley (R-IA)   Hatch (R-UT)   Heller (R-NV)
Hoeven (R-ND)   Inhofe (R-OK)   Johnson (R-WI)
Kennedy (R-LA)   Lankford (R-OK)   Lee (R-UT)
McCain (R-AZ)   McConnell (R-KY)   Moran (R-KS)
Murkowski (R-AK)   Perdue (R-GA)   Portman (R-OH)
Risch (R-ID)   Roberts (R-KS)   Rounds (R-SD)
Rubio (R-FL)   Sasse (R-NE)   Scott (R-SC)
Shelby (R-AL)   Strange (R-AL)   Sullivan (R-AK)
Thune (R-SD)   Tillis (R-NC)   Toomey (R-PA)
Wicker (R-MS)   Young (R-IN)
NAYs – 48  (to KEEP the current protections)
Baldwin (D-WI)   Bennet (D-CO)   Blumenthal (D-CT)
Booker (D-NJ)   Brown (D-OH)   Cantwell (D-WA)
Cardin (D-MD)   Carper (D-DE)   Casey (D-PA)
Coons (D-DE)   Cortez Masto (D-NV)   Donnelly (D-IN)
Duckworth (D-IL)   Durbin (D-IL)   Feinstein (D-CA)
Franken (D-MN)   Gillibrand (D-NY)   Harris (D-CA)
Hassan (D-NH)   Heinrich (D-NM)   Heitkamp (D-ND)
Hirono (D-HI)   Kaine (D-VA)   King (I-ME)
Klobuchar (D-MN)   Leahy (D-VT)   Manchin (D-WV)
Markey (D-MA)   McCaskill (D-MO)   Menendez (D-NJ)
Merkley (D-OR)   Murphy (D-CT)   Murray (D-WA)
Nelson (D-FL)   Peters (D-MI)   Reed (D-RI)
Sanders (I-VT)   Schatz (D-HI)   Schumer (D-NY)
Shaheen (D-NH)   Stabenow (D-MI)   Tester (D-MT)
Udall (D-NM)   Van Hollen (D-MD)   Warner (D-VA)
Warren (D-MA)   Whitehouse (D-RI)   Wyden (D-OR)
Not Voting – 2
Isakson (R-GA)   Paul (R-KY)

Ohio:  Brown (D-OH), Nay  Portman (R-OH), Yea

Ohio U.S. representatives

Please check below to see how YOUR U.S. Rep voted today on HJ 69, (renamed SJ Res 18 in the U.S. Senate). Then, call him either to thank him for his vote or to respectfully tell him his vote does not represent your views and why.

Ohio U.S. reps voted strictly on party lines. 

Steve Chabot (R) YES (513) 684-2723
Warren Davidson (R) YES (513) 779-5400
Bob Gibbs (R) YES (419) 207-0650 
Jim Jordan (R) YES (419) 999-6455
Bill Johnson (R) YES (740)-376-0868
David Joyce (R) YES (440) 352-3939
Bob Latta (R) YES (419) 354-8700
Jim Renacci (R) YES (330) 336-3001
Steve Stivers (R) YES (614) 771-4968
Pat Tiberi (R) YES (614) 895-0900
Mike Turner (R) YES (937) 225-2843
Brad Wenstrup (R) YES (513) 474-7777

Joyce Beatty (D) NO (202) 225-4324 
Marcia Fudge (D) NO (216) 522-4900
Marcy Kaptur (D) NO (216) 767-5933
Tim Ryan (D) NO (330) 630-7311

http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2017/roll098.xml (Check non-Ohio US reps’ votes here)

Will you be an advocate for outside dogs in your community?

Want to be a champion for chained dogs?

Is it legal in your community to abandon dogs to the backyard in both plummeting, winter temperatures and sweltering, summer heat? 

Why not take initiative where you live to see a tethering ordinance passed? 

Two, huge paws up!

Two, huge paws up to the many, proactive, Ohio communities that have already passed common sense legislation!  Tethering ordinances exist in more than thirty-six, Ohio jurisdictions and more than twenty states.

Most of the Ohio ordinances are based on the Cleveland ordinance, linked here. 

http://library.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/cleveland_oh/cityofclevelandohiocodeofordinances?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:cleveland_oh  

(Cleveland ordinance)

https://columbus.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=3154969&GUID=A4FB5290-B19C-4FC4-8DC1-935C900C77A5&Options=ID|Text|&Search= 

(Columbus ordinance)

The Cincinnati, tethering ordinance was passed and went into effect on October 12, 2016. It is enforced by the Cincinnati Police Department. 

Common tethering ordinances do not allow the animal to be tied outside in extreme weather, between 10 PM – 6 AM, and when the owner is not home.

Often, these ordinances are quickly passed because dedicated city leaders understand the importance not only of protecting their animals, but also safeguarding their residents against nuisance and aggressive behavior, associated with endlessly chained animals. 

Please note that Ohio counties cannot pass a tethering ordinance.  Each jurisdiction within the county must pass the ordinance on its own.

      Promoting Public Safety

Tethering ordinances are good for both our animals and our communities.  They are common sense requirements  for the endlessly tethered dogs, who lead lives of frustration, loneliness, and boredom. Tying the animals without relief encourages the dogs to be defensive of their small territory.

The ordinances also promote safeguards for people, particularly children, who may wander into the dog’s area and encounter a dog poised to defend his small space.   CDC reports that a tethered dog is 3 times more likely to bite.  Children under 12 are 5 times more likely to be bitten by a dog.

Animal cruelty is powerfully connected to interpersonal violence and some, untreated, mental illness.  The animal abuse and extreme neglect can be a red flag that others in the area (children, elders, partners) are also in danger. 

Contributing to Quality of Life 

Tethered dogs are often the source of community nuisance.  They bark, howl, and whine continuously in their neighborhoods.  Needless tension and ongoing conflicts arise among neighbors over those annoying cries at all hours.

Yards and city lots with scruffy dogs tied to a stake, that often use old, worn out cars or rusted barrels as their shelter, are unsightly. They add to urban blight.

Encouraging Humane Treatment of Animals 

Dogs suffer physically and psychologically.  Endlessly tethering a dog out back, with no social interaction, with no relief from habitual pacing in a small area, with no protection from extreme weather – is unconscionable. 

Dogs on tethers can be injured or killed.  They get tangled around a tree, a pole, or a bush.  They can hang themselves on a fence. Their collars can become too tight or embedded in their necks. 

Our laws should reflect our community values.  Cincinnati, where I live, is a place where people care about their next-door neighbors – human and canine – and their fifty-two neighborhoods.  They want to live in healthy, vibrant, and top-notch communities, where families and their animals are safe, respected, and well-treated.

I strongly urge you to call your city council or township trustees TODAY to get a tethering ordinance passed where you live.

Need help?  PM me, Beth Sheehan, or J.D. Cooke on FB. 

Check out Jason’s FB page, Unchain Ohio, at the link.

https://www.facebook.com/unchainohio/?fref=nf

Let’s unchain outside dogs!

Proponent Testimony of Mike Smeck

                                                       HOUSE BILL 60

                 PROPONENT TESTIMONY OF Mike Smeck, Representative

Animal Cruelty Task Force of Ohio, Joseph’s Legacy, Justice for Herbie, Ohio Coalition of Dog Advocates, Nitro Foundation/Nitro’s Ohio Army, Ohio Voters for Companion Animals, Inc., Paws and the Law, Matt Ditchey, Esq. (Angels for Animals)  

                                                      May 26, 2015

                  House Agriculture and Rural Development Committee

Good morning Chairman Hill and Members of the House Agriculture and Rural Development Committee. My name is Mike Smeck and I currently reside with my family in Amherst, Ohio (Lorain county). I am here today speaking on behalf of the following seven grassroots animal welfare organizations: Animal Cruelty Task Force of Ohio, Joseph’s Legacy, Justice for Herbie, Nitro Foundation/Nitro’s Ohio Army, Ohio Coalition of Dog Advocates, Ohio Voters for Companion Animals, Inc., Paws and the Law and Matt Ditchey, Esq. (Angels for Animals) as a proponent for Ohio House Bill 60 as introduced in the 131st Ohio General Assembly.

Representing over 67,000 constituents across 72 Ohio counties, our seven Ohio-citizen driven, community based organizations are the driving force behind legislative efforts to address issues impacting the health and safety of companion animals as defined under Ohio Revised Code 959. Our supporters include a diverse section of voters and taxpayers from across the state, including but not limited to, a broad range of dog enthusiasts, veterinarians, breeders, animal care and welfare organizations, animal control representatives, appointed humane agents, judges, attorneys, and government employees who understand state and federal governance.

Given our coalition’s dedication to educate and support the law enforcement and judicial communities in the enforcement and administration of Ohio’s animal welfare laws, I want to begin my testimony by thanking Representatives Patmon and Hall for their leadership in sponsoring this important piece of legislation for Ohioans.

Companion animal cruelty is viewed as a serious issue by law enforcement and mental health professionals, who recognize the strong link between companion animal abuse and human violence. While Ohio’s humane ranking has improved over the past four years with the passage of House Bill 14 in the 129th Ohio General Assembly and Nitro’s Law as an amendment to House Bill 59 in the 130th Ohio General Assembly, when we look closely at our cruelty statute it remains rather weak in comparison to other states across the country.

We also feel strongly that as we continue to make headway on the opiate issue, we will see new trends — and conversation is suggesting this is already happening — of people who harm companion animals in order to obtain a prescription for an opiate with no intent to provide that level of care to the companion animal, but instead use the narcotic personally or sell it for profit.

Given these concerns, our coalition firmly believes the passage of HB 60 as introduced would represent the emergence of a statewide consensus that egregious abuse against a companion animal should be treated as a serious crime. Although there is much more work left to be done, to enact a felony provision for companion animal cruelty beyond Nitro’s Law would mark a significant milestone in an undeniable trend favoring increased penalties for those who commit profound, intentional acts of serious physical injury against all companion animals, to include dogs regardless of where they may be kept.

It is our hope this Committee will reflect on the opinions expressed by our seven groups and their supporters in today’s testimony prior to recommending Ohio House Bill 60 as introduced for review and passage by the House Agriculture and Rural Development Committee. As the representative for Animal Cruelty Task Force of Ohio, Joseph’s Legacy, Justice for Herbie, Nitro Foundation/Nitro’s Ohio Army, Ohio Coalition of Dog Advocates, Ohio Voters for Companion Animals, Inc., Paws and the Law and Matt Ditchey, Esq. (Angels for Animals), I greatly appreciate your time and consideration on this important piece of legislation for Ohioans, and I welcome any questions you may have.

Christmas Comes to the Capitol

Merry Christmas to all good people, whose compassionate, unyielding advocacy has strengthened protections for our beloved, companion animals!

‘Twas the night before Christmas

When all through the hushed House

Not a state rep was stirring

Senators were quiet as a mouse.

 

When out on the capitol lawn

There arose cacophonous clatter

Senator Obhof leapt to his feet

Calling, “Rosenberger, whatever’s the matter?”

 

They flew to the window. They peered through its wreath.

One wringing his hands, while gnashing his teeth.

‘Cause what to their wondering eyes should appear?

Lively dogs with their advocates, in a joyful atmosphere!

 

Multitudes of campaigners, dogs running through the snow,

Constituents with families, voters in chilly tableau.

“What committee has our bills?  What dog protections are new?

The year’s nearly over. What judicial decisions have you?”

 

We’ve come from Cuyahoga, Ashtabula, and Pike so far away

We have to know what you’ve decided. What final words do you say?”

They looked at the crowd, then back at each other.

They looked at Franklin granddads, Brown sisters, and Clark brothers.

 

Democrats chanting on the left, staunch Republicans to the right.

Why even some independents were pulling into sight.

Our leaders huddled together, in need of a solid plan

To bring prosperity, peace, and justice to reign in our land.

 

What to do about these decisions, weighing heavily on each heart!

What about the lobbyists, smashing animal laws before they start?

Just then the town clock struck midnight.  Heaven’s Christmas star twinkled so clear.

I wouldn’t have believed it myself, if I hadn’t been there to see and hear.

 

Ohio’s stoic Senate, with immovable House in tow

Underwent awesome changes, breaking gridlock and status quo!

Hearts suddenly aglow with mercy, grace not known before,

For all their constituents, for hopeless souls, even for homeless poor.

 

For Ohio dogs suffering, abandoned, mistreated, all alone

Our judicial branch passed animal laws, with unity before unknown.

A calm and a hush fell over the crowd, assembled in Columbus that night

Faces stared in wonder, while compassion lit hearts contrite.

 

Our governor bestowed his blessings, on his newly passed mandates

To protect companion animals, throughout his Buckeye state!

Those gathered there in Columbus, remember that Eve so well.

For Democrats and Republicans were able to wave farewell

To polls, to ads, to feuds, divisiveness, to deeply ingrained spite.

At the end of that moonlit session, the Statehouse finally got it right!

Now when Ohioans feel that first chill, and see new fallen snow

They nod and smile thoughtfully, ’bout that numinous night, long ago.