Tag Archives: FBI

Will you be an advocate for outside dogs in your community?

Want to be a champion for chained dogs?

Is it legal in your community to abandon dogs to the backyard in both plummeting, winter temperatures and sweltering, summer heat? 

Why not take initiative where you live to see a tethering ordinance passed? 

Two, huge paws up!

Two, huge paws up to the many, proactive, Ohio communities that have already passed common sense legislation!  Tethering ordinances exist in more than thirty-six, Ohio jurisdictions and more than twenty states.

Most of the Ohio ordinances are based on the Cleveland ordinance, linked here. 

http://library.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/cleveland_oh/cityofclevelandohiocodeofordinances?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:cleveland_oh  

(Cleveland ordinance)

https://columbus.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=3154969&GUID=A4FB5290-B19C-4FC4-8DC1-935C900C77A5&Options=ID|Text|&Search= 

(Columbus ordinance)

The Cincinnati, tethering ordinance was passed and went into effect on October 12, 2016. It is enforced by the Cincinnati Police Department. 

Common tethering ordinances do not allow the animal to be tied outside in extreme weather, between 10 PM – 6 AM, and when the owner is not home.

Often, these ordinances are quickly passed because dedicated city leaders understand the importance not only of protecting their animals, but also safeguarding their residents against nuisance and aggressive behavior, associated with endlessly chained animals. 

Please note that Ohio counties cannot pass a tethering ordinance.  Each jurisdiction within the county must pass the ordinance on its own.

      Promoting Public Safety

Tethering ordinances are good for both our animals and our communities.  They are common sense requirements  for the endlessly tethered dogs, who lead lives of frustration, loneliness, and boredom. Tying the animals without relief encourages the dogs to be defensive of their small territory.

The ordinances also promote safeguards for people, particularly children, who may wander into the dog’s area and encounter a dog poised to defend his small space.   CDC reports that a tethered dog is 3 times more likely to bite.  Children under 12 are 5 times more likely to be bitten by a dog.

Animal cruelty is powerfully connected to interpersonal violence and some, untreated, mental illness.  The animal abuse and extreme neglect can be a red flag that others in the area (children, elders, partners) are also in danger. 

Contributing to Quality of Life 

Tethered dogs are often the source of community nuisance.  They bark, howl, and whine continuously in their neighborhoods.  Needless tension and ongoing conflicts arise among neighbors over those annoying cries at all hours.

Yards and city lots with scruffy dogs tied to a stake, that often use old, worn out cars or rusted barrels as their shelter, are unsightly. They add to urban blight.

Encouraging Humane Treatment of Animals 

Dogs suffer physically and psychologically.  Endlessly tethering a dog out back, with no social interaction, with no relief from habitual pacing in a small area, with no protection from extreme weather – is unconscionable. 

Dogs on tethers can be injured or killed.  They get tangled around a tree, a pole, or a bush.  They can hang themselves on a fence. Their collars can become too tight or embedded in their necks. 

Our laws should reflect our community values.  Cincinnati, where I live, is a place where people care about their next-door neighbors – human and canine – and their fifty-two neighborhoods.  They want to live in healthy, vibrant, and top-notch communities, where families and their animals are safe, respected, and well-treated.

I strongly urge you to call your city council or township trustees TODAY to get a tethering ordinance passed where you live.

Need help?  PM me, Beth Sheehan, or J.D. Cooke on FB. 

Check out Jason’s FB page, Unchain Ohio, at the link.

https://www.facebook.com/unchainohio/?fref=nf

Let’s unchain outside dogs!

Outlaw Bestiality in Ohio

Bestiality Must Be Outlawed

Bestiality makes us very uncomfortable.  It is too hard to talk about, even with our families.  It involves the unspeakable. It is one of our last taboos, boiling beneath the surface of our well-ordered communities. 

But it is an outlier of deviant behavior so extreme that it must be banned.  It is a marker of a seriously disturbed mind.  It is clear sign of a combustible danger, hidden from our immediate view. 

Animals are the perfect victims.  They are easy to restrain and control … and they can never tell.  Animal casualties are often reported first by animal control or neighbors. A dog’s whimpering or a cat’s frenzy may finally attract the attention of a nearby-resident. 

But there may be less visible victims, tyrannized, in a nearby house of suffering.  The children, the partners, the elderly, the handicapped – they may also be ensnared in an endless web of fear and pain.

Children and animals often appear together as easy victims of prey.  For example, when law enforcement agencies confiscate the computers of trolls of child pornography, there is generally a trove of bestiality photos and videos also stored on those, same devices.  

The FBI recognizes the importance of sexual animal abuse as an strong indicator of human crimes.  In January of 2016, the FBI began, for the first time, to require the 18,000, local and state, law enforcement agencies to report animal cruelty in a stand-alone category, “crimes against society”.

Bestiality is a warped, vile act.  It can be a powerful precursor of sexual homicide predators. It is also practiced by violent criminals, sex offenders, and the sexually abused.

Bestiality has health risks too.  Animals can carry and transmit human, sexual diseases, bacterial or parasitic infections, as well as cancer-causing viruses. 

WHAT YOU CAN DO

SB 195, “Bestiality”, has a hearing for all testimony on November 30, 2016.  Please call the leadership of the Senate Criminal Justice Committee in support of SB 195.

Sen John Eklund, chair  (614) 644-7718  eklund@ohiosenate.gov 

Sen Jim Hughes, vice-chair  (614) 466-5981   hughes@ohiosenate.gov

Sen Cecil Thomas, ranking minority member (614) 466-5980  thomas@ohiosenate.gov

Sample script follows.  Please tweak it a bit. Your original words make a larger impact in Columbus.  Also, calls are count for more because they require an aide to fully listen.  E-mails can be quickly scanned. – However, if you only have time for e-mails, thank you for your work! 

“Good morning, Chair Eklund.  This is (your name) from (your city).  I strongly encourage you to move SB 195, “Bestiality”, to a vote and then VOTE YES.  Bestiality remains legal in about a dozen states, including Ohio.  Bestiality is a twisted, violent act, well connected to other predatory acts and highly correlated to pedophilia.  It is well documented that the seized computers of pedophillacs generally contain both child sexual victims and animal sexual victims.

“Bestiality must be outlawed and then prosecuted to its fullest.  The successful prosecution of bestiality will save a lifetime of heartache and expenses for those children and their families who also fall prey to the same sinister individuals. 

“Again, I encourage you to bring SB 195, “Bestiailty”, to a vote and then to VOTE YES to protect our communities, our children, and our animals from sexual violence.” 

Call your US rep today in support of HR 2293, the PACT Act (Prevent Animal Cruelty and Torture)!

A landmark bill, HR 2293, the PACT Act (Prevent Animal Cruelty and Torture) is the first ever, federal bill aimed at prosecuting intentional animal cruelty.  The PACT Act gives the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the U.S. Attorneys the authority to investigate and to prosecute animal cruelty cases.  While individual states across the nation have their own animal cruelty statutes, this federal bill grants an even wider reach into areas where individual states’ laws do not reach.

https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/2293  (Read the bill here.)

Sponsor:  Rep. Lamar Smith (R-TX)

Cosponsors: Reps. Trent Franks (AZ), Raul Grijalva (AZ), Martha McSally (AZ), Julia Brownley (CA), Ken Calvert (CA), Tony Cardenas (CA), Judy Chu (CA), Susan Davis (CA), Sam Farr (CA), Grace Napolitano (CA), Scott Peters (CA), Adam Schiff (CA), Eric Swalwell (CA), Mark Takano (CA), David G. Valadao (CA), Mike Coffman (CO), Rosa L. DeLauro (CT), Elizabeth H. Esty (CT), Theodore Deutch (FL), Lois Frankel (FL), Alcee L. Hastings (FL), Vern Buchanan (FL),Carlos Curbelo (FL),  Frederica S. Wilson (FL), Austin Scott (GA), Dold, Robert Dold (IL), Mike Quigly (IL), Peter J. Visclosky (IN), Michael E. Capuano (MA), Stephen Lynch (MA),  James McGovern (MA), Chris Van Hollen (MD), John Sarbanes (MD), Chellie Pingree (ME), Keith Ellison (MN), Rodney P. Frelinghuysen (NJ), Donald Norcross (NJ), Eliot L Engel (NY), John Katko (NY), Frank LoBiondo (NJ), Albio Sires (NJ), Joseph Heck (NV), Dina Titus (NV), Nita M. Lowey (NY), Jerrold  Nadler (NY), Louise McIntosh Slaughter (NY), David Price (NC), Joyce Beatty (OH), Steve Chabot (OH), Steve Stivers (OH), Michael Turner (OH), Earl Blumenauer (OR),  Suzanne Bonamici (OR), Mike Kelly (PA), Brendan F. Boyle (PA), Matt Cartwright (PA), Michael G. Fitzpatrick (PA), Tom Marino (PA), Patrick Meehan (PA), David N. Cicilline (RI), Steve Cohen (TN),  Beto O’Rourke (TX), Barbara Comstock (VA), Gerald E. Connolly (VA), Peter Welch (VT), Derek Kilmer (WA), Adam Smith (WA), Gwen Moore (WI), Mark Pocan (WI)

                                                         WHAT YOU CAN DO

First, locate your federal representative.

http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/   (Find your US representative here by typing in your zip code in the box.)

Second, if your federal representative is not listed as a cosponsor above, call him to ask him if he will cosponsor this bill.  You might say, “Good morning, Representative ________.  I am _ (your name)__ from __(your city)__, __(your state)__ .  I am one of your constituents.  I am calling today to ask you to cosponsor  HR 2293, the PACT Act.  This important federal bill allows the FBI and the U.S. Attorneys to investigate and to prosecute intentional, animal cruelty.

“This is particularly important in today’s culture of violence because of the powerful connections between interpersonal violence, animal cruelty, and some, mental illness. Where there is animal cruelty, we all are at risk.”

If your federal representative is listed, please call him thanking him for sponsoring HR 2693.

You might say, “Dear Representative _______.  I am _(your name)__ from __(your city)__, __(your state)_.  I am one of your constituents.  I am calling to thank you for cosponsoring HR 2293, the PACT Act.

“As you know, because of the powerful connections between interpersonal violence, animal cruelty, and some mental illness, where there is animal abuse, we are all at risk.”