Tag Archives: tethering

Are the people and animals in your Cincinnati neighborhood safe and warm?

Winter is bearing down hard. Please check on your elderly and handicapped neighbors, who live alone, as well as animals who may be abandoned.  Make sure that they are safe and warm.  

Cincinnati has an ordinance in place for outside dogs.  The dogs may not be endlessly tethered between 10 PM and 6 AM, when the temperatures fall below 20 degrees, when there is an extreme weather advisory, and when no one is home.   

The ordinance is enforced, because of the generosity of our Cincinnati Police Department.  Please call a non-emergency number to politely report an animal in distress.

Kindly thank the Cincinnati police officers, who work under very stressful conditions to protect us and the animals we love!

Read the tethering ordinance at the link below.

http://city-egov.cincinnati-oh.gov/Webtop/ws/council/public/child/Blob/46099.pdf?rpp=-10&m=2&w=doc_no%3D%27201601333%27  

Will you be an advocate for outside dogs in your community?

Want to be a champion for chained dogs?

Is it legal in your community to abandon dogs to the backyard in both plummeting, winter temperatures and sweltering, summer heat? 

Why not take initiative where you live to see a tethering ordinance passed? 

Two, huge paws up!

Two, huge paws up to the many, proactive, Ohio communities that have already passed common sense legislation!  Tethering ordinances exist in more than thirty-six, Ohio jurisdictions and more than twenty states.

Most of the Ohio ordinances are based on the Cleveland ordinance, linked here. 

http://library.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/cleveland_oh/cityofclevelandohiocodeofordinances?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:cleveland_oh  

(Cleveland ordinance)

https://columbus.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=3154969&GUID=A4FB5290-B19C-4FC4-8DC1-935C900C77A5&Options=ID|Text|&Search= 

(Columbus ordinance)

The Cincinnati, tethering ordinance was passed and went into effect on October 12, 2016. It is enforced by the Cincinnati Police Department. 

Common tethering ordinances do not allow the animal to be tied outside in extreme weather, between 10 PM – 6 AM, and when the owner is not home.

Often, these ordinances are quickly passed because dedicated city leaders understand the importance not only of protecting their animals, but also safeguarding their residents against nuisance and aggressive behavior, associated with endlessly chained animals. 

Please note that Ohio counties cannot pass a tethering ordinance.  Each jurisdiction within the county must pass the ordinance on its own.

      Promoting Public Safety

Tethering ordinances are good for both our animals and our communities.  They are common sense requirements  for the endlessly tethered dogs, who lead lives of frustration, loneliness, and boredom. Tying the animals without relief encourages the dogs to be defensive of their small territory.

The ordinances also promote safeguards for people, particularly children, who may wander into the dog’s area and encounter a dog poised to defend his small space.   CDC reports that a tethered dog is 3 times more likely to bite.  Children under 12 are 5 times more likely to be bitten by a dog.

Animal cruelty is powerfully connected to interpersonal violence and some, untreated, mental illness.  The animal abuse and extreme neglect can be a red flag that others in the area (children, elders, partners) are also in danger. 

Contributing to Quality of Life 

Tethered dogs are often the source of community nuisance.  They bark, howl, and whine continuously in their neighborhoods.  Needless tension and ongoing conflicts arise among neighbors over those annoying cries at all hours.

Yards and city lots with scruffy dogs tied to a stake, that often use old, worn out cars or rusted barrels as their shelter, are unsightly. They add to urban blight.

Encouraging Humane Treatment of Animals 

Dogs suffer physically and psychologically.  Endlessly tethering a dog out back, with no social interaction, with no relief from habitual pacing in a small area, with no protection from extreme weather – is unconscionable. 

Dogs on tethers can be injured or killed.  They get tangled around a tree, a pole, or a bush.  They can hang themselves on a fence. Their collars can become too tight or embedded in their necks. 

Our laws should reflect our community values.  Cincinnati, where I live, is a place where people care about their next-door neighbors – human and canine – and their fifty-two neighborhoods.  They want to live in healthy, vibrant, and top-notch communities, where families and their animals are safe, respected, and well-treated.

I strongly urge you to call your city council or township trustees TODAY to get a tethering ordinance passed where you live.

Need help?  PM me, Beth Sheehan, or J.D. Cooke on FB. 

Check out Jason’s FB page, Unchain Ohio, at the link.

https://www.facebook.com/unchainohio/?fref=nf

Let’s unchain outside dogs!

Can you give 10 minutes a week to curb animal cruelty & neglect?

Newark, Ohio City Council voted to ban BDL!

When Newark passes an ordinance to protect its dogs and to safeguard its community, dogs and their families across the nation also gain.  Awareness grows.  Momentum increases.

Do you have 10 minutes each week to curb animal cruelty and neglect?   Please  join Paws and the Law’s humane community.  We work together across Ohio to advance state and local initiatives.   Your part is easy.  You can even work from the comfort of your home.  

Paws and the Law closely follows legislative initiatives for companion animals. When a critical point, like a hearing or a vote is about to happen, you will receive contact information for important decision makers and a sample script.  You, of course, can use your own narrative.   Can you give 10 – 15 minutes a week, working from home, to work against animal cruelty?

If so, PM Beth Sheehan with your e-mail address today.

A list of the current, companion animal bills in the Ohio General Assembly follows.  Most of our bills languish and die in the Ohio Senate.  The 131st General Assembly ends on December 31, 2016.  All bill not passed then, will have to be reintroduced in the next GA.

But if we all do whatever we can, where we are, together we will be an awesome force for good for our beloved cats and dogs.

BILLS in the 131st GENERAL ASSEMBLY

1.  HB 45 – Humane Officer Training          SUPPORT

Sponsor: 

Cosponsors: Representatives Jack Cera,  Michael Stinziano,  Debbie Phillips,  Sean O’Brien,  Cheryl Grossman, Michele Lepore-Hagan

Status – Local Government Committee

Summary – “to require an individual to file proof of successful completion of training with the county recorder prior to being appointed as a humane society agent and to require the revocation or suspension of an appointment under certain circumstances”

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-45  (Read HB 45 here.)

(NOTE –  The humane officer has 20 hours of special training in how to approach and to analyze an animal crime scene. Additionally, HB 45 gets rid of the residency requirement.  Right now a humane officer can only work in the county in which he lives.  By getting rid of the residency requirement, the same amount of officers can spread out to additional counties to investigate animal cruelty.

Finally, many, Ohio counties, especially rural ones, have no humane officer.)

2.  HB 60 – “Goddard’s Law”, felony for animal cruelty – ENACTED

(NOTE – Read linked blog for an explanation of possible, unintended consequences of amendment.   http://pawsandthelawblog.com/?p=373 )

Sponsors: Representatives Bill Patmon  and David Hall

Cosponsors:  Representatives Nickie J. Antonio, Tim W. Brown, John Patterson,  Marilyn Slaby, Sarah LaTourette, Cheryl Grossman, Janine R. Boyd, Jack Cera, John Barnes, David Leland, Michele Lepore-Hagan, Debbie Phillips, Michael Sheehy, Mark Romanchuk,  Louis W. Blessing, Margaret Ann Ruhl, Marlene Anielski, Mike Ashford, Nan Baker, Nicholas J. Celebrezze, Mike Dovilla, Denise Driehaus, Teresa Fedor, Bob Hackett, Stephen Hambley,   Michael Henne, Stephanie D. Howse, Greta Johnson, Terry Johnson, Michael O’Brien, Sean O’Brien, Dorothy Pelanda,  Dan Ramos, John Rogers, Kirk Schuring, Barbara Sears, Stephen Slesnick, Kent Smith, Marting Sweeney   

Summary – “to revise provisions and penalties regarding treatment of companion animals, to revise the definition of “companion animal” in the Offenses Relating to Domestic Animals Law, and to provide a state collaborative effort to assist veterinarians in identifying clients who may use their animals to secure opioids for abuse”

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-60  (Read HB 60 here.) 

(NOTE – HB 60, “Goddard’s Law”, felony for animal cruelty, is the next step for Ohio after “Nitro’s Law”. I’d like to explain felony for animal abuse in Ohio right now.  MOST animal abuse is a misdemeanor in Ohio.  There are two, specific times when animal abuse is a felony.  First, the SECOND TIME that an offender is convicted of animal cruelty, it is a felony.  The first time that offender is convicted it is a misdemeanor.    Second, if an animal “in the care of a kennel” is intentionally harmed by the manager, the owner, or the employees, it is a felony.  This is “Nitro’s Law”.

Additionally, Ohio judges are mandated to seek community sanctions (no jail) for certain nonviolent offenders because of prison overcrowding.  Animal abusers are considered by law to be nonviolent.

So, at sentencing, the animal abusers often end up with no jail time, a fine, AND they get their animal back.)

3.  HB 94 – Cruelty, Neglect, and Tethering          SUPPORT

Sponsor: Representative John Barnes, Jr.

Cosponsors: Representatives Mike Duffey,  Michele Lepore-Hagan,  Margaret Ruhl

Status – House Agriculture & Rural Development Committee, 1st hearing

Summary – “to prohibit a person from negligently allowing an animal to be tethered outdoors under specified circumstances”

(NOTE – HB 94 protects animals from being endlessly chained outside in extreme weather.  It also gives specification to the type of shelter the outside dogs need. So, for example,  it’s not “adequate shelter” to have a dog in a plastic igloo in plummeting temperatures.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-94  (Read HB 94 here.)

 4.  HB 121 – Service Dog Awareness Week – ENACTED

Sponsors:  Representatives Michael Stinziano  and Margaret Ann Ruhl

Cosponsors: Representatives Ron Amstutz, Nicholas Celebrezze, Michele Lepore-Hagan, Debbie Phillips, Jeffery Rezabek, Ronald V. Gerberry, Cheryl Grossman, Bob Hackett, Stephen Slesnick, Martin Sweeney, Sarah LaTourette, Nickie J. Antonio, Nan A. Baker, Andrew Brenner, Thomas E. Brinkman, Tim W. Brown, Jim Buchy, Hearcel F. Craig, Robert R. Cupp, Timothy  Derickson, Denise Driehaus, Teresa Fedor, Timothy E. Ginter, Christina Hagan, David Hall, Stephen Hambley, Brian Hill, Greta Johnson, Terry Johnson, Christie Bryant Kuhns, Stephanie Kunze, Al Landis, David Leland,  Michael O’Brien, Sean O’Brien, Rick Perales, Dan Ramos, John Rogers, Mark Romanchuk, Tim Schaffer, Barbara Sears, Michael Sheehy, Marilyn Slaby, Kent Smith, Robert Sprague, Emilia Strong Sykes, Ron Young

Summary – “to designate the last week of July as ‘Service Dog Awareness Week’”

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-121(Read HB 121 here.)  

(NOTE – HB 121 highlights the unique skills a service animal provides to his owner so that the owner is able to become more independent and mobile in his own life.  It also informs business owners of the rights the service animal and his owner have when they enter their places of business.)

5.  HB 187 – First Responders May Give First Aid to Pets  – ENACTED

Sponsor: Representative Timothy Ginter

Cosponsors: Representatives Sarah LaTourette, Blessing III, Schaffer, Vitale, Michele Lepore-Hagan, Margaret Ruhl, Becker, Steve Hambley

Summary – “to authorize a first responder, emergency medical technician-basic, emergency medical technician-intermediate, emergency medical technician-paramedic, or volunteer firefighter to stabilize an injured animal in an emergency”

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-187  (Read HB 187 here.)

(NOTE – HB 187 clearly defines what first responders may do on behalf of our pets in a crisis, such as a fire or a car accident.  They may provide oxygen to a stressed animal or a splint to his injured leg before the animal goes to a veterinarian.)

6.  HB 198 – Special Prosecutors         OPPOSED

(NOTE – Read linked, opponent testimony of Matt Ditchey, representative of eight, Ohio grassroots groups.  http://pawsandthelawblog.com/?p=367)

Sponsors :  Representatives Steve Hambley and Greta Johnson

Cosponsors:

Summary – “to abolish the humane society’s authority to employ an attorney to prosecute certain violations of law dealing with animal cruelty or acts involving mistreatment or nonsupport of children”

Status: Referred to House Judiciary committee

Click here to view the full text of the bill as introduced in the House – > https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-198

 7.  HB 215 – Animal Fighting          SUPPORT

Sponsors: Representatives Barbara Sears and Heather Bishoff

Cosponsors: Representatives Cheryl  Grossman,  Brian Hill,  Steven  Kraus, Sarah LaTourette,  David Leland,  Robert McColley,  Debbie Phillips,  Michael Sheehy, Michael Stinziano

Summary – “to prohibit and establish an increased penalty for knowingly engaging in activities associated with cockfighting, bearbaiting, or pitting an animal against another”

Status – Passed out of House in February of 2016 

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-215  (Read HB 215 here.)

8.  House Bill No. 278 – County Humane Societies – OPPOSE

Sponsor: Representative Steve Hambley 

Summary – “to require approval by the board of county commissioners, instead of the probate judge, of appointments of agents by county humane societies outside a municipal corporation, to specify that a county humane society is a political subdivision, to make its directors, agents, officers, and employees subject to the Ethics Law, and to increase the salaries paid to the agents.”

Status: Referred to Government Accountability and Oversight Committee 

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legis…/legislation-summary…

(Read HB 278 here.)

9.  House Bill No. 447 – Killing Police Animal 

Sponsors: Representatives Kirk Schuring and Stephen Slesnick 

Summary – to prohibit a person from intentionally killing a police dog or horse in the line of duty.

Status: Referred to State Government committee

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legis…/legislation-summary…

(Read HB 447 here.)

10.  House Bill 450 – Officer May Purchase His Police Animal 

Sponsors: Representatives Andy Thompson and Dave Hall 

Summary – to authorize a law enforcement officer to purchase a police dog or horse for one dollar when the officer retires in good standing from a law enforcement agency 

Status: Referred to State Government Committee

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legis…/legislation-summary…  

(Read HB 450 here.)

11.  HB 573 – Dogs Sold in Pet Stores –  OPPOSE

12.  SB 151, “The Klonda Richey Act”           INTERESTED

Sponsor:   Senator Bill Beagle

Cosponsor: Senator  Peggy Lehner

Summary – “to define  nuisance, dangerous, and vicious dogs, to revise enforcement of that Law, and to establish a notification process regarding complaints of certain violations of that law”

Status –  State and Local Government Committee

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-SB-151 (Read SB 151 here.)

13. Senate Bill No. 195 – Bestiality – INTERESTED

Sponsors: Senators Jim Hughes and Sen. Jay Hottinger 
Cosponsors: Senators Kenny Yuko, Frank LaRose, Sandra R. Williams

Summary – “to prohibit a person from engaging in sexual conduct with an animal and related acts, to provide for the seizure and impoundment of an animal that is the subject of a violation, and to authorize a sentencing court to require an offender to undergo psychological evaluation or counseling.”

Status: Referred to Criminal Justice committee

 https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legis…/legislation-summary…

(Read SB 195 here.)

14.  SB 215 –  “Good Samaritan” –  ENACTED

Sponsors: Senators Jim Hughes and Frank LaRose

Cosponsors: Senators  Joe Uecker, Kevin Bacon, Bill Beagle, Dave Burke, Bill Coley, Randy Gardner, Cliff Hite, Jay Hottinger, Shannon Jones, Kris Jordan, Peggy Lehner, Gayle Mannning, Larry Obhof, Tom Patton, Tom Sawyer,  Joe Schiavoni, Charleta B. Tavares, Cecil Thomas, Kenny Yuko 

Summary – to allow individuals to rescue a pet or a child in danger in an unattended vehicle without liability

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-votes?id=GA131-SB-215  (Read SB 215 here.)

15. Senate Bill 271 – Purchase Police Animal – INTERESTED

Sponsor: Sen. Lou Gentile 

Summary – “to authorize a law enforcement officer to purchase a police dog or horse for fair market value when the officer retires in good standing from a law enforcement agency and certain conditions are met.”

Status: Referred to Agriculture Committee
 
 https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legis…/legislation-summary…

17. Senate Bill 286 – Killing Police Animal – INTERESTED

Sponsor: Sen. Jim Hughes 

Summary – “to modify the penalty for assaulting a police dog or horse to require, if the dog or horse is killed, a mandatory prison term and a mandatory fine to be paid to the law enforcement agency served by the dog or horse.”

Status: Passed out of House committee 

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legisl…/legislation-status…

18.  SB 331 – Dogs Sold in Pet Stores –  OPPOSE

Status: Voted out of Senate

Candidates for Ohio Senate and Ohio House – November 8, 2016

VOTE SMART for HUMANE LEGISLATORS on November 8!

The single most important act you can take to curb animal cruelty and extreme neglect is to VOTE SMART!  We vote for our legislators.  They vote for our bills.

There are 33 seats in the Ohio Senate.  Half are up for election.  

Our bills languish and die in the Senate year after year.  So, please be an informed voter, especially when you are voting for your state senator.   Paws and the Law can publish past voting records.  That way you can see how your senate candidate voted on our companion animal bills.  

However, many candidates are new.  So, they have no voting records.  You will have to call those candidates who have no voting record.  Ask them specific questions.   “Which companion animal bills have you sponsored  in the past?”  “How would you vote on a felony for animal cruelty bill?” “How would you vote on an animal abuse registry?” “How would you vote on a tethering bill?”

Be sure to talk up the humane candidates among your friends, family, and coworkers.  Most people do not know who their state senator and state rep are until they begin to follow state legislation. So, you will be helping others to be informed.

Each voter has one state rep and one state senator.  

Find your state rep and your state senator at the following link.  Fill in both boxes.  The first box is for your zip code.  The second is for your 4-digit extension.  If you do not know your 4-digit extension, there is a quick link right above the boxes.

If you have done everything correctly, you will see just two names, your state rep and your state senator.  PM me, Beth Sheehan, with those two names.  I’ll give you their contact information.

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislators/find-my-legislators

Candidates for Ohio Senate – November 8, 2016

Half of the Ohio Senate seats are up for reelection.  Each voter votes for no more than one senator. 

  • I – “incumbent”, (N) – “new; no voting record”
State Senate – District 01 (R) R (I) Cliff Hite
State Senate – District 01 (R) R (N) Corey Shankleton
State Senate – District 01 (R) R (N) Milo Schaffner
State Senate – District 03 (D) D (N) Star Johnson
State Senate – District 03 (R) R (I) Kevin Bacon
State Senate – District 03 (R) R (N) Kevin Solveson
State Senate – District 05 (D) D (N) Thomas Matthew
State Senate – District 05 (D) D (N) Dee Gillis
State Senate – District 05 (D) D (N) Joe Lacey
State Senate – District 05 (R) R (I) Bill Beagle
State Senate – District 07 (D) D (N) Jimmy Allen
State Senate – District 07 (R) R (N) Kelly Kohls
State Senate – District 07 (R) R (I) Shannon Jones
State Senate – District 09 (D) D (N) Angela Beamon
State Senate – District 09 (D) D (N) Joe Hye
State Senate – District 09 (D) D (N) Catherine  Ingram
State Senate – District 09 (D) D (N) Dale Mallory
State Senate – District 09 (D) D (N) Paul Sohi
State Senate – District 09 (D) D (I) Cecil Thomas
State Senate – District 09 (R) R (N) Jackie Mikita
State Senate – District 11 (D) D (I) Edna Brown
State Senate – District 11 (R) R (N) Ernest McCarthy
State Senate – District 13 (D) D (N) Marcus Madison
State Senate – District 13 (R) R (I) Gayle Manning
State Senate – District 15 (D) D (I) Charleta Tavares
State Senate – District 15 (L) L (N) Jeff Brown
State Senate – District 15 (R) R (N) Joe Healy
State Senate – District 17 (R) R (I) Bob Peterson
State Senate – District 19 (D) D (N) Neil Patel
State Senate – District 19 (R) R (I) Kris Jordan
State Senate – District 21 (D) D (I) Sandra Williams
State Senate – District 21 (D) D (N) Willie Britt
State Senate – District 21 (D) D (N) Gerald Henley
State Senate – District 21 (R) R (N) Sikiru Kafaru
State Senate – District 23 (D) D (I) Michael Skindell
State Senate – District 23 (R) R (N) Tom Haren
State Senate – District 23 (R) R (N) Harry Ristmae
State Senate – District 25 (D) D (I) Kenny Yuko
State Senate – District 25 (D) D (N) Ed Jerse
State Senate – District 25 (D) D (N) Thaddeus Jackson
State Senate – District 25 (R) R (N) Hasani Crider
State Senate – District 27 (D) D (N) George Rusiska
State Senate – District 27 (R) R (I) Frank LaRose
State Senate – District 27 (R) R (N) Caleb Davenport
State Senate – District 29 (D) D (N) Connie Rubin
State Senate – District 29 (R) R (N) Dennis Harbert
State Senate – District 29 (R) R (I) Scott Oelslager
State Senate – District 31 (D) D (N) John Carlisle
State Senate – District 31 (R) R (I) Jay Hottinger
State Senate – District 33 (D) D (I) Joseph Schiavoni

Candidates for the Ohio House -November 8, 2016

All ninety-nine, House seats are on the March ballot.  Each voter votes for no more than one representative.

Directions for finding your state rep and state senator are above the Senate candidates.

  • I – “incumbent”,  N – “new, no voting records available”

State Representative – District 01 (R) (N) Republican David C. Kiefer State Representative – District 01 (R) (N) Republican Scott Wiggam 

State Representative – District 02 (D) (N) Democratic Brittany Bowman    State Representative – District 02 (R) (I) Republican Mark J. Romanchuk 

State Representative – District 03 (D) (N) Democratic David Walters    State Representative – District 03 (R) (I) Republican Tim W. Brown 

State Representative – District 04 (R) (I) Republican Bob Cupp 

State Representative – District 05 (D) (N) Democratic John R. Dyce,   State Representative – District 05 (R) (I) Republican Tim Ginter 

State Representative – District 06 (D) (N) Democratic Phillip Robinson,   State Representative – District 06 (R) (I) Republican Marlene Anielski 

State Representative – District 07 (D) (N) Democratic David J. Thurau,   State Representative – District 07 (R) (N) Republican Jennifer M. Herold,   State Representative – District 07 (R) (N) Republican Thomas F. Patton

State Representative – District 08 (D) (I)  Democratic Kent Smith,  State Representative – District 08 (R) (N) Republican Cassandra McDonald

State Representative – District 09 (D) (I) Democratic Janine Boyd  State Representative – District 09 (D) (N) Democratic Isaac Powell,  State Representative – District 09 (R) (N) Republican Joe Miller

State Representative – District 10 (D) (I) Democratic Bill Patmon,  State Representative – District 10 (R) (N) Republican Thomas Pekarek

State Representative – District 11 (D) (I) Democratic Stephanie Howse,   State Representative – District 11 (R) (N) Republican

Shakira Taylor State Representative – District 12 (D) (I) Democratic John E. Barnes,  State Representative – District 12 (D) (N) Democratic Jill Miller Zimon

State Representative – District 13 (D) (I) Democratic Nickie J. Antonio 

State Representative – District 14 (D) (I) Democratic Martin J. Sweeney 

State Representative – District 15 (D) (I) Democratic Nicholas J. Celebrezze 

State Representative – District 16 (D) (N) Democratic Tommy Greene,  State Representative – District 16 (R) (N) Republican Dave Greenspan

State Representative – District 17 (D) (N) Democratic Matt Jolson,  State Representative – District 17 (D) (N) Democratic Adam Miller,  State Representative – District 17 (R ) (N) Republican John Rush

State Representative – District 18 (D) (I) Democratic Kristin Boggs,   State Representative – District 18 (D) (N) Democratic Joshua Clark,   State Representative – District 18 (D) (N) Democratic Adhanet Kifle,  State Representative – District 18 (G) (N) Green Constance A. Gadell Newton, State Representative – District 18 (R) (N) Republican Whitney Smith

State Representative – District 19 (D) (N) Democratic Michael Johnston,  State Representative – District 19 (R) (I) Republican Anne Gonzales 

State Representative – District 20 (D) (I) Democratic Heather Bishoff,   State Representative – District 20 (R) (N) RepublicanBobby Mitchell,   State Representative – District 20 (R) (N) Republican Lisa Schacht

State Representative – District 21 (D) (N) Democratic Ryan Koch  State Representative – District 21 (R) (I) Republican Mike Duffey

State Representative – District 22 (D) (I) Democratic David Leland,  State Representative – District 22 (R) (N) Republican Linda L. Jarrett

State Representative – District 23 (D) (N) Democratic Lee Schreiber,   State Representative – District 23 (R) (N) Republican Mike Lanese

State Representative – District 24 (D) (N) Democratic Kristopher Keller,   State Representative – District 24 (R) Republican Jim Hughes

State Representative – District 25 (D) (N) Democratic Napoleon A. Bell,  State Representative – District 25 (D) (N) Democratic Dontavius Carrells,  State Representative – District 25 (D) (N) Democratic Bernadine Kennedy Kent,  State Representative – District 25 (D) (N) Democratic Jeffrey D. Mackey,   State Representative – District 25 (D) (N) Democratic Mayo Makonde,   State Representative – District 25 (R) (N) Republican Seth-Golding

State Representative – District 26 (D) (I) Democratic Hearcel F. Craig,   State Representative – District 26 (R) (N) Republican Kenneth H. Collins

State Representative – District 27 (D) (N) Democratic Joe-Otis,   State Representative – District 27 (R) (I) Republican Tom Brinkman

State Representative – District 28 (D) (N) Democratic Regina A. Collins,   State Representative – District 28 (D) (N) Democratic Jessica Miranda,   State Representative – District 28 (R) (I) Republican Jonathan Dever

State Representative – District 29 (R) (I) Republican Louis W. Blessing

State Representative – District 30 (D) (N) Democratic Mark A. Childers,   State Representative – District 30 (R) Republican Bill Seitz

State Representative – District 31 (D) (N) Democratic Paul M. Booth,   State Representative – District 31 (D) (N) Democratic Brian Garry,   State Representative – District 31 (D) (N) Democratic Nicholas W. Hollan,   State Representative – District 31 (D) (N) Democratic Brigid Kelly,   State Representative – District 31 (D) (N) Democratic Ben Lindy,   State Representative – District 31 (D) (N) Democratic Paul Sohi,   State Representative – District 31 (R) (N) Republican Mary Yeager

State Representative – District 32 (D) (N) Democratic Shawn Butler,   State Representative – District 32 (D) (N) Democratic Leo D’Cruz,  State Representative – District 32 (D) (N) Democratic Catherine Ingram,   State Representative – District 32 (D) (N) Democratic Kevin Johnson,   State Representative – District 32 (R) (N) Republican Matthew H. Wahlert

State Representative – District 33 (D) (I) Democratic Alicia Reece,   State Representative – District 33 (R) (N) Republican David Miller

State Representative – District 34 (D) (I) Democratic Emilia Sykes,   State Representative – District 34 (R) (N) Republican Gene Littlefield

State Representative – District 35 (D) (I) Democratic Greta Johnson,   State Representative – District 35 (R) (N) Republican Joe Vassel

State Representative – District 36 (D) (N) Democratic Bobby McDowell,  State Representative – District 36 (R) (I) Republican Anthony DeVitis

State Representative – District 37 (D) (N) Democratic Tom Schmida,   State Representative – District 37 (R) (I) Republican Kristina Daley Roegner

State Representative – District 38 (D) (N) Democratic Matt Browarek,   State Representative – District 38 (D) (N) Democratic Judith Lynn Lee,   State Representative – District 38 (R) (I) Republican Marilyn Slaby

State Representative – District 39 (D) (I) Democratic Fred Strahorn

State Representative – District 40 (D) (N) Democratic David L. Richards,   State Representative – District 40 (R) (I) Republican Michael E. Henne,   State Representative – District 40 (R) (N) Republican Thomas McMasters

State Representative – District 41 (D) (N) Democratic James M. Calhoun   State Representative – District 41 (R) (I) Republican Jim Butler

State Representative – District 42 (D) (N) Democratic Pat Merris,   State Representative – District 42 (R) (I) Republican Niraj J. Antani

State Representative – District 43 (D) (N) Democratic David B. Sparks,  State Representative – District 43 (R) (I) Republican Jeff Rezabek

State Representative – District 44 (D) (I) Democratic Michael D. Ashford,  State Representative – District 44 (R) (N) Republican John Insco

State Representative – District 45 (D) (I) Democratic Teresa Fedor,   State Representative – District 45 (R) (N) Republican James S. Nowak

State Representative – District 46 (D) (I) Democratic Michael P. Sheehy,   State Representative – District 46 (R) (N) Republican Diana M. Skaff

State Representative – District 47 (D) (N) Democratic Michael Sarantou,   State Representative – District 47 (R) (N) Republican Vicki L. Donovan Lyle,   State Representative – District 47 (R ) (N) Republican Kevin G. Haddad,   State Representative – District 47 (R) (N) Republican Barbara S. Lang,   State Representative – District 47 (R) (N) Republican Derek Merrin

State Representative – District 48 (D) (N) Democratic Jennifer M. Bigham, State Representative – District 48 (R) (I) Republican Kirk Schuring

State Representative – District 49 (D) (N) Democratic Joyce Healy Abrams,   State Representative – District 49 (D) (N) Democratic Thomas E. West,   State Representative – District 49 (R) (N) Republican Dan F. McMasters

State Representative – District 50 (D) (N)  Democratic John L. Juergensen,  State Representative – District 50 (R) (I) Republican Christina M. Hagan

State Representative – District 51 (D) (N)  Democratic Johnny H. Hamilton,   State Representative – District 51 (R) (N) Republican Courtney E. Combs,   State Representative – District 51 (R) (I) Republican Wes Retherford

State Representative – District 52 (R) (I) Republican Margaret K. Conditt,   State Representative – District 53 (D) (N) Democratic Suzi Rubin,   State Representative – District 53 (R) (N) Republican Candice Keller,   State Representative – District 53 (R) (N) Republican Joe Mulligan  

State Representative – District 54 (D) (N) Democratic Rick Smith,   State Representative – District 54 (R) (I) Republican Paul Zeltwanger  

State Representative – District 55 (D) (N) Democratic Kevin Watkinson,   State Representative – District 55 (R) (I) Republican Nathan H. Manning  

State Representative – District 56 (D) (I) Democratic Dan Ramos,  State Representative – District 56 (R) (N) Republican Jessie Mae Tower  

State Representative – District 57 (D) (N) Democratic Tom Dunlap,   State Representative – District 57 (R) (N) Republican Kathryn Frombaugh,   State Representative – District 57 (R) (N) Republican Timothy M. Opsitnick,   State Representative – District 57 (R) (N) Republican Dick Stein,   State Representative – District 57 (R) (N) Republican Lee Charles Waldrop  

State Representative – District 58 (D) (I) Democratic Michele Lepore-Hagan,  State Representative – District 58 (D) (N) Democratic Michael E. O’Hara,  State Representative – District 58 (R) (N) Republican Corrine Sanderson  

State Representative – District 59 (D) (I) Democratic John A. Boccieri,   State Representative – District 59 (R) (N) Republican Don Manning,   State Representative – District 59 (R) (N) Republican Jim Murphy  

State Representative – District 60 (D) (I) Democratic John M. Rogers,   State Representative – District 60 (R) (N) Republican Robert Rule

State Representative – District 61 (D) (N) Democratic Rick Walker   State Representative – District 61 (R) (I) Republican Ron Young  

State Representative – District 62 (D) (N) Democratic Samuel P. Ronan,   State Representative – District 62 (R) (N) Republican Scott Lipps,   State Representative – District 62 (R) Republican Steve Muterspaw,   State Representative – District 62 (R) (N) Republican Ray Warrick  

State Representative – District 63 (D) (N) Democratic Glenn W. Holmes,   State Representative – District 63 (D) (N) Democratic Marianne James,  State Representative – District 63 (D) (N)  Democratic Benjamin A. Kyle,   State Representative – District 63 (R) (N) Republican Devon A. Stanley

State Representative – District 64 (D) (I)  Democratic Michael J. O’Brien,   State Representative – District 64 (R) (N) Republican Richard H laudy,   State Representative – District 64 (R) (N) Republican Martha Yoder  

State Representative – District 65 (D) (N) Democratic Amy Brewer,  State Representative – District 65 (R) (N) Republican John Becker

State Representative – District 66 (D) (N) Democratic Ken P. McNeely,   State Representative – District 66 (R) (I) Republican Doug Green

State Representative – District 67 (D) (N) Democratic Janet Breneman,   State Representative – District 67 (R) (I) Republican Andrew O. Brenner

State Representative – District 68 (D) (N) Democratic John Russell,   State Representative – District 68 (R) (N) Republican W. Myles Bancroft,   State Representative – District 68 (R) Republican Rick Carfagna   State Representative – District 68 (R) Republican Beth Lear   State Representative – District 68 (R) Republican Patrick J. Quinn State Representative – District 68 (R) Republican Jason Rogers

State Representative – District 69 (D) Democratic Frank A. Zona   State Representative – District 69 (R) (I) Republican Steve Hambley   State Representative – District 69 (R) Republican Chris M. Sawicki

State Representative – District 70 (R) Republican Steven W. Johnson   State Representative – District 70 (R) Republican Darrell D. Kick   State Representative – District 70 (R) Republican Lisa Woods

State Representative – District 71 (D) Democratic Joseph S. Begeny   State Representative – District 71 (R) (I) Republican Scott K. Ryan

State Representative – District 72 (D) Democratic John J. Carlisle,   State Representative – District 72 (R) Republican Randal B. Almendinger,   State Representative – District 72 (R) Republican Cliff N. Biggers,   State Representative – District 72 (R) Republican Larry Householder

State Representative – District 73 (D) Democratic Brian K. Housh,   State Representative – District 73 (R) (I) Republican Rick Perales

State Representative – District 74 (D) Democratic Barb Niemeyer,   State Representative – District 74 (R) Republican Bill Dean,   State Representative – District 74 (R) Republican Joe Russell,   State Representative – District 74 (R) Republican Brendan P. Shea,   State Representative – District 74 (R) Republican Chris Wallace

State Representative – District 75 (D) (I) Democratic Kathleen Clyde,   State Representative – District 75 (R) Republican Jim Lutz

State Representative – District 76 (D) Democratic Terri McIntee,   State Representative – District 76 (R) (I) Republican Sarah LaTourette

State Representative – District 77 (D) Democratic Bradley S. Nicodemus,   State Representative – District 77 (R) (I) Republican Tim Schaffer

State Representative – District 78 (R) (I) Republican Ron Hood

State Representative – District 79 (D) Democratic Alex Wendt,  State Representative – District 79 (R) (I) Republican  Kyle Koehler

State Representative – District 80 (R) (I) Republican Stephen A. Huffman

 State Representative – District 81 (R) (I) Republican Robert McColley

State Representative – District 82 (R) (I) Republican Tony Burkley,    State Representative – District 82 (R) Republican Craig Riedel

State Representative – District 83 (D) Democratic Mary E. Marshfield   State Representative – District 83 (R) Republican Kevin Rettig   State Representative – District 83 (R) (I) Republican Robert Cole Sprague

State Representative – District 84 (D) Democratic Ed Huff   State Representative – District 84 (R) Republican Keith Faber

State Representative – District 85 (R) (I) Republican Nino Vitale   State Representative – District 86 (D) Democratic Scott Crider

State Representative – District 86 (R) (I) Republican Dorothy Pelanda 

State Representative – District 87 (R) Republican Wes Goodman,   State Representative – District 87 (R) Republican Steve E. Reinhard,   State Representative – District 87 (R) Republican Tom Whiston

State Representative – District 88 (R)  Republican Bill Reineke

State Representative – District 89 (D) Democratic Dannie K. Edmon,   State Representative – District 89 (D) Democratic Lawrence D. Hartlaub,   State Representative – District 89 (R) (I)  Republican Steven M. Arndt

State Representative – District 90 (D) Democratic Tara Cordle,   State Representative – District 90 (R) (I) Republican Terry A. Johnson

State Representative – District 91 (R) (I) Republican Cliff Rosenberger

State Representative – District 92 (R) (I) Republican Gary K. Scherer

State Representative – District 93 (R) (I) Republican Ryan Smith

State Representative – District 94 (D) Democratic Sarah H. Grace,   State Representative – District 94 (D) Democratic Eddie Smith,   State Representative – District 94 (R) Republican Jay Edwards

State Representative – District 95 (D) Democratic Ginny Faved,   State Representative – District 95 (R) (I) Republican Andy Thompson

State Representative – District 96 (D) (I) Democratic Jack Cera,   State Representative – District 96 (D) Democratic Patrick F. Murphy

State Representative – District 97 (R) (I) Republican Brian D. Hill

State Representative – District 98 (D)Democratic Jeremiah M. Johnson,   State Representative – District 98 (R) (I) Republican Al Landis

State Representative – District 99 (D) (I) Democratic JohnPatterson

 

Grace and Her Pups, Cincinnati, Outside Dogs

Does it matter to you that some dogs are outside year round without the protection of a decent shelter during extreme temperatures and in hazardous weather?  These animals may also be tied to a tree or chained to a stake.  Here is the shocking story, written by a compassionate friend, of one Cincinnati dog, Grace, and her pups.

“In the winter of 2010 we rescued a female dog and her 8 week old pup from a residence in Cincinnati, Ohio. ‘Grace’ had lived her entire life tied to a tree with absolutely no shelter from the frigid winter or blazing heat of the summers and with very little food.  The winter she was rescued, she had had six puppies and five of those puppies died from exposure, frozen solid to the ground, before anyone got involved. Grace somehow managed to keep one puppy alive. We named him Willy. When we rescued Grace and Willy they were sick and totally emaciated. They would not have survived another night in the frigid winter weather. It is hard to imagine what life was like for Grace, and even harder to imagine how she survived giving birth while tied to a tree in the freezing cold of winter with no shelter.”

Have you got five minutes at home each week to give to help outside dogs?  Then, please join Paws and the Law today.  PM Beth Sheehan to get started.  

Ohio can and should do better!

What is your commitment to Ohio dogs and cats – silver, gold, platinum, or bronze?

Our pets need protection with greater enforcement of existing law and further enactment of stronger laws.

I commit to do what I can, where I am for our beloved cats and dogs.

Silver Level

I can easily work from the comfort of my home. I will use social media to promote awareness of animal cruelty and neglect.  I can easily “like”, share, and comment.

I will also tweet the news articles so that newspaper editors will be alerted to my interest in animal welfare. Editors take note of the number of interactions on their web sites and plan future coverage on those numbers.  So, the more interactions there are with the articles, the more future coverage there will be.

Gold Level

I will use social media and will encourage my family and friends to connect too in order to broaden our humane-minded community.

Platinum Level

I’ll stay connected to my humane community.  I will also write / call / visit important local and state politicians in support of companion animal legislation.

I will attend the peaceful rallies and pet events near my home that Nitro’s Ohio Army organizes. His Army is “boots on the ground” to advocate for justice for individual animals that have been injured or killed and to educate the public about companion animal bills and laws. 

I will be an active, informed voter. I will take note of which candidates are humane-minded.

Bronze Level

I love what you are doing in Ohio to help dogs and cats.  I live outside of Ohio, but I am with you in spirit, cheering you to victory.  I’ll use social media to promote your efforts.  I hope similar initiatives succeed across the nation.

Companion Animal Bills in the 131st General Assembly

                Get political for Ohio cats, dogs, and people at risk!

                  Follow Paws and the Law to be an informed advocate.

                     Thank you for doing what you can, where you are, for our beloved cats and dogs.

Here are the main points of and links to current, Ohio, companion animal bills. Most are necessary bills that not only aim to protect our beloved cats and dogs, but they also will safeguard our state’s most vulnerable populations, elderly, children, handicapped, and partners.

There are one hundred thirty-two state senators and state representatives. They vote on our bills. Each Ohio voter can vote for only one state representative and one state senator, based on where he lives.

Make certain you know who your state rep and state senator are. You will want to be in contact with those two legislators in support of or opposed to these bills.

                               Find your state representative and state senator

Your two most important state legislators are your own state rep and state senator. (Senators Brown and Portman are US congressional senators.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/ (Locate your state rep and your state senator here by typing in your zip code PLUS four digit extension in the two boxes next to “Find my legislators”. Questions? PM Beth Sheehan)

                                          Bills in the 131st General Assembly

1. HB 45, Humane Officer Training – SUPPORT

Introduced – February 10, 2015

Assigned to Local Government Committee – February 11, 2015

Sponsor:

Cosponsors: Representatives Jack Cera,  Michael Stinziano,  Debbie Phillips,  Sean O’Brien,  Cheryl Grossman,  Michele Lepore-Hagan

(HB 45 IS IMPORTANT.  The humane officer has 20 hours of special training in how to approach and to analyze an animal crime scene.

Additionally, HB 45 gets rid of the residency requirement. Right now a humane officer can only work in the county in which he lives. By getting rid of the residency requirement, the same amount of officers can spread out to additional counties to investigate animal cruelty.

Finally, many, Ohio counties, especially rural ones, have no humane officer right now.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-45 (Read HB 45 here.)

2.  HB 60, ‘Goddard’s Law’ – enacted into Ohio law

 Sponsors: Representatives Bill Patmon and Dave Hall

Cosponsors: Representatives Nickie J. Antonio,  John Barnes, Jr.,  Louis W. Blessing III,  Janine R. Boyd,  Tim W. Brown,  Jack Cera,  Cheryl L. Grossman, Sarah LaTourette, David Leland, Michele Lepore-Hagan,  John Patterson, Debbie Phillips, Mark J. Romanchuk,  Michael Sheehy, Marilyn Slaby, Margaret Ann Ruhl, Marlene Anielski, Mike Ashford, Nan A. Baker, Nicholas J. Celebrezze, Mike Dovilla, Denise Driehaus, Teresa Fedor, Bob D. Hackett, Stephen D. Hambley, Michael Henne, Stephanie D. Howse, Greta Johnson, Terry Johnson, Michael J. O’Brien, Sean O’Brien, Dorothy Pelanda, Dan Ramos, John M. Rogers, Kirk Schuring, Barbara Sears, Stephen Slesnick, Kent Smith, Martin J. Sweeney

(HB 60 IN ITS ORIGINAL FORM was important.   “Goddard’s Law”, felony for animal cruelty, is the next step for Ohio after “Nitro’s Law”. Let’s look at felony for animal abuse in Ohio right now. MOST animal abuse is a misdemeanor in Ohio. There are two, specific times when animal abuse is a felony. First, the SECOND TIME that an offender is convicted of animal cruelty, it is a felony. The first time that offender is convicted it is a misdemeanor.   Second, if an animal “in the care of a kennel” is intentionally harmed by the manager, the owner, or the employees, it is a felony. This is “Nitro’s Law”.

Additionally, Ohio judges are mandated to seek community sanctions (no jail) for certain nonviolent offenders because of prison overcrowding. Animal abusers are considered by law to be nonviolent.

So, the animal abusers often end up with no jail time, a fine, AND they get their animal back.

This bill, when it was in the 130th General Assembly, was very much stronger.   HB 60 WITH THE AMENDMENT seriously dilutes the bill and does not adequately protect our cats and dogs.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-60

(Read HB 60 here.)

3.  HB 94, Cruelty, Neglect, and Tethering  – SUPPORT

Introduced – March 2, 2015

Assigned – March 4, 2015 to Agriculture and Rural Development

Sponsor: Representative  John Barnes Jr.

Cosponsors: Representatives Mike Duffey, Michele Lepore-Hagan, and Margaret Ann Ruhl

(HB 94 IS IMPORTANT.  It aims to curb animal cruelty, neglect, and endless tethering.  Owners are neither permitted to tether their animals outside when there are weather advisories nor when the owner is not home.

There is specification for appropriate shelter.  So, the plastic igloo at twenty degrees below zero and the deck twenty feet away from the dog in ninety-five degrees is not “adequate shelter”. )

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-94

(Read HB 94 here.)

4.  HB 121, Service Dog Awareness Week – Support

Introduced – March 12, 2015

Passed House – 93 – 0 – May 13, 2015; Passed Senate – 33 – 0

HB 121 is on its way to the governor’s desk.

Sponsors: Representatives Michael Stinziano and Margaret Ann Ruhl

Cosponsors: Representatives Ron Amstutz, Nicholas J. Celebrezze, Michele Lepore-Hagan, Debbie Phillips, Jeffery S. Rezabek, Cheryl L. Grossman, Bob D. Hackett, Stephen Slesnick, Martin J. Sweeney, Sarah LaTourette, Nickie J. Antonio, Nan A. Baker, Andrew Brenner, Thomas E. Brinkman, Jr., Tim W. Brown, Jim Buchy, Hearcel F. Craig, Robert R. Cupp, Timothy Derickson, Denise Driehaus, Teresa Fedor, Timothy E. Ginter, Christina Hagan, David Hall, Stephen D. Hambley, Brian Hill, Greta Johnson, Terry Johnson, Christie Bryant Kuhns, Stephanie Kunze, Al Landis, David Leland, Michael J. O’Brien, Sean O’Brien, Rick Perales, Dan Ramos, John M. Rogers, Mark J. Romanchuk, Tim Schaffer, Barbara R. Sears, Michael Sheehy, Marilyn Slaby, Kent Smith, Robert Sprague, Emilia Strong Sykes, Ron Young, Senators  Bill Beagle, Charleta B. Tavares, Edna Brown

(HB 121 IS IMPORTANT because it educates the public about the unique skills that a service animal has that allow his owner to be more independent in his life.  It also informs business owners of the rights the service animal owner and service animal have while in the store, movie, or restaurant.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-121

(Read HB 121 here.)

5.  HB 187, First Responders May Stabilize Pets in Emergencies – goes into effect September 12, 2016

Sponsor: Representative Timothy Ginter

Cosponsors: Representatives LaTourette, Blessing III, Schaffer, Vitale, Michelle Lepore-Hagan, Margaret Ruhl, Becker, Hambley

(HB 187 IS IMPORTANT – It clearly defines what first responders may do on behalf of our pets if they are in a crisis, like a fire or a car accident. They can provide oxygen with a ventilator or mouth to snout to a stressed animal or a splint to his injured leg before the animal goes to a veterinarian.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-187

(Read HB 187 here.)

6.  HB 198, Special Prosecutors Appointed by Humane Societies – OPPOSE

Introduced – May 11, 2015

Assigned to Judiciary Committee – May 19, 2015

Sponsor: Representatives Stephen Hambley and Greta Johnson

Cosponsors: Representatives Heather Bishoff, Terry Boose, Bob D. Hackett, Brian Hill, Doug Green, Michael J. O’Brien

(IT IS IMPORTANT TO OPPOSE HB 198 because it limits the choices a humane society has in prosecuting animal cruelty.  Additionally, it may have encourage humane societies to prosecute animal abuse crimes as misdemeanors instead of felonies.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-198

(Read HB 198 here.)

7.  HB 267,  “Trooper’s Bill” – SUPPORT

Sponsor: Representative Margaret Ruhl

Cosponsors: Representatives Andrew Brenner, Teresa Fedor, Cheryl Grossman, Sarah LaTourette, Michele Lepore-Hagan, Andy Thompson

(This bill aims to establish a deer sanctuary license to allow a licensee to raise deer, to establish requirements governing such a license, to require the Chief of the Division of Wildlife to issue a wild animal permit to allow a permit holder to rehabilitate deer, to establish procedures that certain law enforcement officers must follow when responding to accidents involving injured or deceased deer, and to require training for those officers regarding humane procedures for euthanizing injured deer.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-267

(Read HB 267 here.)

8.  HB 447, “Killing Police Dogs in the Line of Duty”  –  SUPPORT

Sponsors: Representatives Schuring and Slesnick

Cosponsors:

Summary – “to increase penalties for intentionally killing police canines in the line of duty”

Status – State Government Committee

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-447

(Read HB 447 here.)

9.  SB 151, “The Klonda Richey Act” – INTERESTED

SPONSOR: Senator Bill Beagle

Cosponsor: Senator Peggy Lehner

Introduced – April 27, 2015

Assigned to Agriculture Committee – April 29, 2015; had hearing in the Senate Agriculture Committee on April 26, 2016

(This bill aims to give clarity to “nuisance, dangerous, and vicious dogs”, to revise enforcement of that Law, and to establish a notification process regarding complaints of certain violations of that Law.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-SB-151

(Read SB 151 here.)

10.  SB 195 – Prohibiting Sexual Contact with Animals – SUPPORT

Introduced – July 16, 2015

Assigned to Criminal Justice Committee – September 17, 2015

Sponsors: Senators Jim Hughes and Jay Hottinger

(SB 195 IS IMPORTANT because having sexual contact with an animal is legal in Ohio.  This bill makes it a misdemeanor to have sexual contact with an animal.  It allows for the seizure and impoundment of the animal that is violated.  Also, it authorizes the court to require an offender to undergo psychological evaluation or counseling.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-SB-195

(Read SB 195 here.)

11.   SB 215 – Good Samaritan – goes into effect on August 31, 2016

 Sponsors: Senators Jim Hughes and Frank LaRose

Cosponsors: Senators Kevin Bacon and Joe Uecker

(SB 215 is an important bill because it allows individuals to rescue pets and children in danger in unattended vehicles with immunity from civil liability.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-SB-215

(Read SB 215 here.)

12.   SB 271 – Police Buys Dog or Horse – SUPPORT

Introduced

Assigned

Sponsor: Senator Lou Gentile

Cosponsors: Senators Kenny Yuko, Shannon Jones, Joe Schiavoni, Capri S. Cafaro, Michael Skindell, Charleta B. Tavares, Cecil Thomas, Frank LaRose

(SB 271 is an important bill that aims to allow a police officer to buy a his police dog or horse at fair market value at retirement.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-SB-271

(Read SB 271 here.)

13. SB 286 – Killing a Police Dog or Horse – SUPPORT

Introduced – February 29, 2016

Assigned to Senate Criminal Justice Committee – April 12, 2016

Sponsor: Senator Jim Hughes

(SB 286 is important because it increases penalty for assaulting a police dog or horse.  It requires, if the dog or horse is killed, a mandatory prison term and a mandatory fine to be paid to the law enforcement agency served by the dog or horse.)

Bills in the 131st General Assembly

Get political for Ohio cats, dogs, and people at risk!

First, learn about current, Ohio companion animal bills and the legislators who represent you in the General Assembly.  Then, get involved in the legislative process by calling, writing, and visiting important, decision-makers in Columbus.

Your voice and your vote are critical!

Here are the main points of and links to current, Ohio, companion animal bills. Most are necessary, common sense bills that not only aim protect our beloved cats and dogs, but they also lead to protections of our state’s most vulnerable populations, the elderly, children, handicapped individuals, and partners.  Moreover, most bills add another prong to deter violence in our communities.

There are one hundred thirty-two state senators and state representatives.  They vote on our bills. Each Ohio voter can vote for only one state representative and one state senator (not all 132 legislators), depending on where that voter lives.

Make certain you know who your state rep and your state senator are.  You will want to be in contact with those two legislators in support of  (or, sometimes, in opposition to) proposed bills.

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/  (Locate your state rep and your state senator here by filling in BOTH boxes.  In the first box, type your zip code.  In the second box, type your 4-digit extension.  If you do not know your 4-digit extension, there is a quick link right above the boxes for you to follow to learn your 4-digit extension.   Questions?  PM Beth Sheehan.)

BILLS in the 131st GENERAL ASSEMBLY

1.  HB 45 – Humane Officer Training          SUPPORT

Sponsor: Representative Ron Gerberry

Cosponsors: Representatives Jack Cera,  Michael Stinziano,  Debbie Phillips,  Sean O’Brien,  Cheryl Grossman, Michele Lepore-Hagan

Status – Local Government Committee

Summary – “to require an individual to file proof of successful completion of training with the county recorder prior to being appointed as a humane society agent and to require the revocation or suspension of an appointment under certain circumstances”

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-45  (Read HB 45 here.)

(NOTE –  The humane officer has 20 hours of special training in how to approach and to analyze an animal crime scene. Additionally, HB 45 gets rid of the residency requirement.  Right now a humane officer can only work in the county in which he lives.  By getting rid of the residency requirement, the same amount of officers can spread out to additional counties to investigate animal cruelty.

Finally, many, Ohio counties, especially rural ones, have no humane officer.)

2.  HB 60 – “Goddard’s Law”, felony for animal cruelty          OPPOSE because of amendment added on June 9, 2015

(NOTE – Read linked blog for an explanation of possible, unintended consequences of amendment.   http://pawsandthelawblog.com/?p=373 )

Sponsors: Representatives Bill Patmon  and David Hall

Cosponsors: Rep. Nickie J. Antonio, Rep. Tim W. Brown, Rep. John Patterson, Rep. Ronald V. Gerberry, Rep. Marilyn Slaby, Rep. Sarah LaTourette, Rep. Cheryl L. Grossman, Rep. Janine R. Boyd, Rep. Jack Cera, Rep. John Barnes, Jr., Rep. David Leland, Rep. Michele Lepore-Hagan, Rep. Debbie Phillips, Rep. Michael Sheehy, Rep. Mark J. Romanchuk, Rep. Louis W. Blessing III, Rep. Margaret Ann Ruhl, Rep. Marlene Anielski, Rep. Mike Ashford, Rep. Nan A. Baker, Rep. Nicholas J. Celebrezze, Rep. Mike Dovilla, Rep. Denise Driehaus, Rep. Teresa Fedor, Rep. Bob D. Hackett, Rep. Stephen D. Hambley, Rep. Michael Henne, Rep. Stephanie D. Howse, Rep. Greta Johnson, Rep. Terry Johnson, Rep. Michael J. O’Brien, Rep. Sean O’Brien, Rep. Dorothy Pelanda, Rep. Dan Ramos, Rep. John M. Rogers, Rep. Kirk Schuring, Rep. Barbara R. Sears, Rep. Stephen Slesnick, Rep. Kent Smith, Rep. Martin J. Sweeney 

Status – HB 60 WITH THE NEW AMENDMENT passed the House.

Summary – “to revise provisions and penalties regarding treatment of companion animals, to revise the definition of “companion animal” in the Offenses Relating to Domestic Animals Law, and to provide a state collaborative effort to assist veterinarians in identifying clients who may use their animals to secure opioids for abuse”

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-60 (Read HB 60 here.) 

(NOTE – HB 60, “Goddard’s Law”, felony for animal cruelty, is the next step for Ohio after “Nitro’s Law”. I’d like to explain felony for animal abuse in Ohio right now.  MOST animal abuse is a misdemeanor in Ohio.  There are two, specific times when animal abuse is a felony.  First, the SECOND TIME that an offender is convicted of animal cruelty, it is a felony.  The first time that offender is convicted it is a misdemeanor.    Second, if an animal “in the care of a kennel” is intentionally harmed by the manager, the owner, or the employees, it is a felony.  This is “Nitro’s Law”.

Additionally, Ohio judges are mandated to seek community sanctions (no jail) for certain nonviolent offenders because of prison overcrowding.  Animal abusers are considered by law to be nonviolent.

So, at sentencing, the animal abusers often end up with no jail time, a fine, AND they get their animal back.)

3.  HB 94 – Cruelty, Neglect, and Tethering          SUPPORT

Sponsor: Representative John Barnes, Jr.

Cosponsors: Representatives Mike Duffey,  Michele Lepore-Hagan,  Margaret Ruhl

Status – House Agriculture & Rural Development Committee, 1st hearing

Summary – “to prohibit a person from negligently allowing an animal to be tethered outdoors under specified circumstances”

(NOTE – HB 94 protects animals from being endlessly chained outside in extreme weather.  It also gives specification to the type of shelter the outside dogs need. So, for example,  it’s not “adequate shelter” to have a dog in a plastic igloo in plummeting temperatures.)

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-94 (Read HB 94 here.)

 4.  HB 121 – Service Dog Awareness Week          SUPPORT

Sponsors:  Representatives Michael Stinziano  and Margaret Ann Ruhl

Cosponsors: Representatives Ron Amstutz, Nicholas Celebrezze, Michele Lepore-Hagan, Debbie Phillips, Jeffery Rezabek, Ronald V. Gerberry, Cheryl Grossman, Bob Hackett, Stephen Slesnick, Martin Sweeney, Sarah LaTourette, Nickie J. Antonio, Nan A. Baker, Andrew Brenner, Thomas E. Brinkman, Tim W. Brown, Jim Buchy, Hearcel F. Craig, Robert R. Cupp, Timothy  Derickson, Denise Driehaus, Teresa Fedor, Timothy E. Ginter, Christina Hagan, David Hall, Stephen Hambley, Brian Hill, Greta Johnson, Terry Johnson, Christie Bryant Kuhns, Stephanie Kunze, Al Landis, David Leland,  Michael O’Brien, Sean O’Brien, Rick Perales, Dan Ramos, John Rogers, Mark Romanchuk, Tim Schaffer, Barbara Sears, Michael Sheehy, Marilyn Slaby, Kent Smith, Robert Sprague, Emilia Strong Sykes, Ron Young

Summary – “to designate the last week of July as ‘Service Dog Awareness Week’”

Status – HB 121 passed out of House and Senate;  needs governor’s signature

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-121 (Read HB 121 here.)  

(NOTE – HB 121 highlights the unique skills a service animal provides to his owner so that the owner is able to become more independent and mobile in his own life.  It also informs business owners of the rights the service animal and his owner have when they enter their places of business.)

5.  HB 187 – First Responders          SUPPORT

Sponsor: Representative Timothy Ginter

Cosponsors: Representatives Sarah LaTourette, Blessing III, Schaffer, Vitale, Michele Lepore-Hagan, Margaret Ruhl, Becker, Steve Hambley

Summary – “to authorize a first responder, emergency medical technician-basic, emergency medical technician-intermediate, emergency medical technician-paramedic, or volunteer firefighter to stabilize an injured animal in an emergency”

Status – House and Aging Committee

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-187 (Read HB 187 here.)

(NOTE – HB 187 clearly defines what first responders may do on behalf of our pets in a crisis, such as a fire or a car accident.  They may provide oxygen to a stressed animal or a splint to his injured leg before the animal goes to a veterinarian.)

6.  HB 198 – Special Prosecutors         OPPOSED

(NOTE – Read linked, opponent testimony of Matt Ditchey, representative of eight, Ohio grassroots groups.  http://pawsandthelawblog.com/?p=367)

Sponsors :  Representatives Steve Hambley and Greta Johnson

Cosponsors:

Summary – “to abolish the humane society’s authority to employ an attorney to prosecute certain violations of law dealing with animal cruelty or acts involving mistreatment or nonsupport of children”

Status: Referred to House Judiciary committee

Click here to view the full text of the bill as introduced in the House – > https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-198

 7.  HB 215 – Animal Fighting          SUPPORT

Sponsors: Representatives Barbara Sears and Heather Bishoff

Cosponsors: Representatives Cheryl  Grossman,  Brian Hill,  Steven  Kraus, Sarah LaTourette,  David Leland,  Robert McColley,  Debbie Phillips,  Michael Sheehy, Michael Stinziano

Summary – “to prohibit and establish an increased penalty for knowingly engaging in activities associated with cockfighting, bearbaiting, or pitting an animal against another”

 Status – Passed out of House in February of 2016 

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-215  (Read HB 215 here.)

8.  HB 447, “Killing Police Dogs in the Line of Duty”  –  SUPPORT

Sponsors: Representatives Schuring and Slesnick

Cosponsors:

Summary – “to increase penalties for intentionally killing police canines in the line of duty”

Status – State Government Committee

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-HB-447

(Read HB 447 here.)

 9.  SB 151, “The Klonda Richey Act”           INTERESTED

Sponsor:   Senator Bill Beagle

Cosponsor: Senator  Peggy Lehner

Summary – “to define  nuisance, dangerous, and vicious dogs, to revise enforcement of that Law, and to establish a notification process regarding complaints of certain violations of that Law”

Status – State and Local Government Committee

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA131-SB-151 (Read SB 151 here.)

 

Make that call to your city hall for outside dogs today!

Our Ohio, outside dogs are suffering in current, plummeting temperatures. Our state is in a deep, winter freeze. Please advocate for better living conditions for the outside dogs in your community.

There are no state laws in place right now to humanely address outside animals, living in desperation and pain. Many concerned people across Ohio are calling their local dog wardens, their police, and their sheriffs without success.  State law simply requires “adequate” food, water, and shelter. “Adequate” generally keeps many dogs outside, in distress, subject to frostbite, hypothermia, and a slow, frightening death.

 
There will be state bills proposed for anti-tethering and extreme temperatures in Ohio. These bills have not yet appeared. It takes a long time for a bill to become a law. Many of our most important, companion animal bills fail.

Please take action locally now, in the city where you live. Here’s a positive, doable plan for you to help outside dogs in your community.

First, organize a dedicated, small group of your friends to advocate for a new, animal ordinance where you live. Meet in a local coffee shop to share ideas and to review the Cleveland animal ordinance, a working model you can use.

 
http://www.city.cleveland.oh.us/CityofCleveland/Home/Government/CityAgencies/PublicSafety/Divisionof%20CityKennels/Kennel_Legislation

(Find Cleveland’s ordinance here. Cruelty to animals, shelter, anti-tethering, weather are found at 603.09)

Two excellent, common sense points in the Cleveland ordinance are that the dog cannot be tied outside if no one is home, nor can he be outside during a weather advisory.

Second, select a local council member to work with you.  This person is crucial to the success of your ordinance.  He will be doing most of the work to advance the ordinance. If he is “wishy-washy” about animals, your ordinance will not be successful.

Call city hall today. Ask for an appointment to meet with the council member regarding improving your local, animal ordinance. Take Cleveland’s ordinance with you as a starting point.

Our companion animal laws need to be strengthened. Start today where you are.

If you feel you cannot organize and meet with your local city council, then share this blog with friends, who might be able to take that initiative for outside dogs.

Please join us today in making “backyard dogs” a footnote for Ohio, history books.

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